Chair

    • John J. Martin
    • Professor and Chair
    • John Jeffries Martin, Chair of the Department of History, is a historian of early modern Europe, with particular interests in the social, cultural, and intellectual history of Italy in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. He is the author of Venice’s Hidden Enemies: Italian Heretics in a Renaissance City (1993), winner of the Herbert Baxter Adams Prize of the American Historical Association, and ...
    • View Full Profile

Associate Chair

    • Nancy MacLean
    • William H. Chafe Professor of History and Associate Chair
    • Nancy MacLean’s scholarship focuses on the role of social movements in changing American culture and public policy, with particular focus on the twentieth century and on the roles of class, gender, race, and region in shaping these movements and determining their outcomes. Her first book, Behind the Mask of Chivalry: The Making of the Second Ku Klux Klan (New York: Oxford University Press, ...
    • View Full Profile

Director of Undergraduate Studies

    • Adriane Lentz-Smith
    • Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies
    • My interests lie in African American history and the history of the US & the World. My 2009 book, Freedom Struggles: African Americans and World War I, looks at the black freedom struggle in the World War I years, with a particular focus on manhood, citizenship claims, and the international experience. My recent research explores how African ...
    • View Full Profile

Assistant to Director of Undergraduate Studies

Director of Graduate Studies

    • Peter H Sigal
    • Professor and Director of Graduate Studies
    • The relationships between gender, sexuality, and colonialism have intrigued me since I began my first book on Maya sexuality. I recently completed a study on the interaction of writing and sexual representation in sixteenth and seventeenth-century Nahua societies--The Flower and the Scorpion: Sexuality and Ritual in Early Nahua Culture (Durham: Duke ...
    • View Full Profile

Assistant to Director of Graduate Studies

Faculty

Full-time Faculty

    • Edward J Balleisen
    • Associate Professor
    • I explore the historical intersections among law, business, culture, society, and politics in the modern United States. My first book, Navigating Failure: Bankruptcy and Commercial Society in Antebellum America (UNC Press, 2001), examined the social experience of business failure in the age of the self-made man, as well as the legal institutions that arose to cope ...

    • View Full Profile
    •  
    • Dirk Bonker
    • Associate Professor
    • I am a historian of the United States and Germany, who focuses on questions of militarism, warfare, and empire in the long twentieth century. In my work, I also address larger questions about how best to "globalize" and "internationalize" U.S and German histories in the modern age.
    • View Full Profile
    • James G. Chappel
    • Assistant Professor
    • I study the intellectual, political, and religious history of modern Europe. I am currently completing a manuscript entitled "The Struggle for Europe's Soul: Catholic Political Economy and the Salvation of Democracy, 1920-1960" (forthcoming from Harvard University Press). This work studies Catholic social-economic thought as a transnational whole, ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Sarah Deutsch
    • Professor
    • My work engages issues of difference, particularly racial, gender, class, and spatial formations. My current book project is “Making a Modern U.S. West, 1898-1942.” I have written three other books, Women and the City: Gender, Space and Power in Boston, 1870-1940 (2000); From Ballots to Breadlines: American Women, 1920-1940 (1994); and No Separate Refuge: Culture, ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Laurent M. Dubois
    • Marcello Lotti Professor of Romance Studies and History
    • View Full Profile
    • Laura F Edwards
    • Professor
    • My research focuses on women, gender, and the law in the nineteenth-century, particularly the U.S. South. In addition to articles on these topics, I have published three books: Gendered Strife and Confusion: The Political Culture of Reconstruction (1997), Scarlett Doesn't Live Here Anymore: Southern Women in the Civil War Era (2000, ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Janet J Ewald
    • Associate Professor
    • My specialty in the history of Africa has led me, in both my teaching and research, to explore how Africans participated in the major currents of world history since about 1700. My first book Soldiers, Traders, and Slaves: State Formation and Economic Transformation in the Greater Nile Valley, 1700-1885 uses oral traditions as well as written sources ...
    • View Full Profile
    • John D French
    • Professor
    • I am an historian of modern Latin America with a specialization in Brazil. Since 2005, I have been working on a book entitled "Lula's Politics of Cunning: From Trade Unionism to the Presidency in Brazil" which draws on a multi-year international research project on “Nurturing Hope, Deepening Democracy, and Combating Inequalities: An Assessment of ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Barry Gaspar
    • Professor
    • Dr. Gaspar concentrates on comparative slave systems, with a special interest in the development of slave society and the evolution of slave life in the United States and the Caribbean. The Atlantic Slave Trade, Atlantic history and culture, the legacy of slavery in post-slave societies, historical geography, colonial British America, and Caribbean ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Raymond Gavins
    • Professor
    • Research and teaching: Modern America, Afro-America, and American South
    • View Full Profile
    • Thavolia Glymph
    • Associate Professor of African & African American Studies and History
    • Having completed Out of the House of Bondage: The Transformation of the Plantation Household (Cambridge, 2008), I turned my attention back to a project begun years before on the experience of enslaved and freed women on the battlefields of the Civil War. This study focuses on the lives of black women and children ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Malachi H. Hacohen
    • Associate Professor
    • MALACHI HAIM HACOHEN (Ph.D., Columbia), Bass Fellow and Associate Professor of History, Political Science and Religion, is Director of the Center for European Studies, and member of the faculty of German and Jewish Studies, as well as the History and Philosophy of Science, Technology & Medicine. He teaches European intellectual history and Jewish ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Bruce S Hall
    • Associate Professor
    • My first book, A history of race in Muslim West Africa, 1600-1960 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011), is about the development of ideas about racial difference along the West African Sahel. The research for this project was focused in and around the Malian town of Timbuktu. My current research centers on a nineteenth-century commercial network ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Engseng Ho
    • Professor of Cultural Anthropology, History and Duke Islamic Studies Center and Professor of History
    • View Full Profile
    • Margaret Humphreys
    • Josiah Charles Trent Professor in the History of Medicine and Professor of Medicine
    • My major research interest is the history of disease in America, especially in the South. Until the last half of the twentieth century diseases such as malaria, yellow fever, pellagra, and hookworm marked the south as tropical, impoverished, and strikingly different from the rest of the United States. My recent work concerns the history of medicine ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Reeve Huston
    • Associate Professor
    • My research focuses on the emergence of two-party democracy in the United States--a process that took place between the 1790s and the 1840s. My current book project examines the origins of Jacksonian democracy. I also think and write about social and political conflicts over the distribution of land in North America during the late eighteenth and ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Anna Krylova
    • Associate Professor
    • Her second book project, “Socialist Imaginaries of the Soviet Century,” reexamines the boundaries that scholars of modern Russia have assigned to Soviet socialism. It begins by inviting scholars to reflect whether the Bolshevik “basic tenets” that informed the imagination of a new type of industrial modernity in the 1900s-1930s could become the actual ...

    • View Full Profile
    • Bruce R. Kuniholm
    • Professor of Public Policy, Professor of History and Professor of History
    • View Full Profile
    • Adriane Lentz-Smith
    • Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies
    • My interests lie in African American history and the history of the US & the World. My 2009 book, Freedom Struggles: African Americans and World War I, looks at the black freedom struggle in the World War I years, with a particular focus on manhood, citizenship claims, and the international experience. My recent research explores how African ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Nancy MacLean
    • William H. Chafe Professor of History and Associate Chair
    • Nancy MacLean’s scholarship focuses on the role of social movements in changing American culture and public policy, with particular focus on the twentieth century and on the roles of class, gender, race, and region in shaping these movements and determining their outcomes. Her first book, Behind the Mask of Chivalry: The Making of the Second Ku Klux Klan (New York: Oxford University Press, ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Jehangir Malegam
    • Assistant Professor
    • My first book focused on clerical self-fashioning and lay-clerical relationships between the eleventh and the thirteenth centuries as seen through the discourse around peace-making and conflict. My new research concerns the history of personhood, con-sociation and alienation during a period of nascent state formation and evangelical outreach in ...
    • View Full Profile
    • John J. Martin
    • Professor and Chair
    • John Jeffries Martin, Chair of the Department of History, is a historian of early modern Europe, with particular interests in the social, cultural, and intellectual history of Italy in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. He is the author of Venice’s Hidden Enemies: Italian Heretics in a Renaissance City (1993), winner of the Herbert Baxter Adams Prize of the American Historical Association, and ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Sucheta Mazumdar
    • Associate Professor
    • Grounded primarily in Chinese history, and secondarily in Indian history, I am excited by the intellectual challenges of writing and teaching comparative global history. Two broad questions frame my research agenda: the radical transformation of circuits of consumption and commodity production that underlie capitalist development, and the politics ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Martin A Miller
    • Professor
    • Professor Miller's interests are in Modern Russian history, the history of psychoanalysis in Russia, and comparative and international terrorist movements and, most recently, documentary photography in the USSR.
    • View Full Profile
    • Kristen Neuschel
    • Associate Professor
    • Dr. Neuschel concentrates on late medieval and early modern France and Europe. Her current research focuses on war and culture in northern Europe between 1400 and 1600. She teaches courses in the history of war, of gender relations and surveys of the history of medieval and early modern Europe.
    • View Full Profile
    •  
    • Jocelyn H Olcott
    • Associate Professor of History and International Comparative Studies
    • I work on feminist history of modern Mexico. My first book, Revolutionary Women in Postrevolutionary Mexico, explores questions of gender and citizenship in the 1930s. I am currently working on two book-length projects: a history of the 1975 UN International Women's Year Conference in Mexico City (under contract with Oxford University Press), and a biography of the ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Simon C Partner
    • Professor
    • Late 19th and 20th-century Japanese history Focusing on: growth of consumer markets; technology and social change; Japanese rural society
    • View Full Profile
    • Gunther W. Peck
    • Associate Professor of Public Policy and History
    • The central problem I have studied as an historian of labor, immigration, and the environment has been the persistence of unfree labor relations in North America and the social, cultural, and geographic reasons for that complex reality. I am currently writing a book entitled "Trafficking in Race: The Rise and Fall of White Slavery, 1700-2000," which explores the ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Sumathi Ramaswamy
    • Professor of History and International Comparative Studies
    • I am a cultural historian of South Asia and the British empire and my research over the last few years has been largely in the areas of visual studies, the history of cartography, and gender. My recent publications in these areas include THE GODDESS AND THE NATION: MAPPING MOTHER INDIA (Duke University Press, 2010); and two edited volumes, BAREFOOT ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Thomas Robisheaux
    • Professor and Fred W. Schaffer Professor of History
    • As an historian of early modern Europe Dr. Robisheaux has particular interests in social and cultural history, German-speaking Central Europe, Renaissance culture, religious reform, popular religion and culture, and microhistory. Author of The Last Witch of Langenburg and Rural Society and the Search for Order in Early Modern Germany, Lost Worlds, and ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Peter H Sigal
    • Professor and Director of Graduate Studies
    • The relationships between gender, sexuality, and colonialism have intrigued me since I began my first book on Maya sexuality. I recently completed a study on the interaction of writing and sexual representation in sixteenth and seventeenth-century Nahua societies--The Flower and the Scorpion: Sexuality and Ritual in Early Nahua Culture (Durham: Duke ...
    • View Full Profile
    •  
    • Philip J Stern
    • Associate Professor
    • My work focuses on the history of Britain and the British Empire, particularly in the early modern period (loosely defined). My first book, The Company-State, is a political and intellectual history of the English East India Company in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. I am currently working on or planning projects related to the history ...
    • View Full Profile
    •  
    • Susan Thorne
    • Associate Professor
    • My research agenda is broadly informed by my interest in the influence of  imperialism on the social and political development of the world's first industrial nation.  My first book, Congregational missions and the making of an imperial culture in nineteenth-century England (Stanford, 1999), extended my Ph.D dissertation's exploration of missionary influences on Victorian perceptions of ...

    • View Full Profile

Secondary Appointments

    •  
    • Jeffrey Baker
    • Professor of Pediatrics and Associate Clinical Professor of History
    • Dr. Baker's research centers on the history of child health and medical technology. Dr. Baker has taught courses on the history of medical ethics, medical technology, and genetics. He has published a book, The Machine in the Nursery, recounting the origins of the premature infant nursery in Europe and the United States. He is now working on a history ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Mona F Hassan
    • Assistant Professor of Religion
    • Mona Hassan specializes in global and comparative Islamic history, with particular interest in the intersections of culture, religion, politics, and gender. She is currently working on her book manuscript, Longing for the Lost Caliphate, which explores Muslim engagement and entanglement with the notion of an Islamic caliphate following two poignant moments ...
    • View Full Profile
    •  
    • Hans J. Hillerbrand
    • Professor Emeritus of Religion and Professor of Religion
    • View Full Profile
    • Robert R. Korstad
    • Professor of Public Policy and History and Professor of Public Policy
    • Social Policy from an historical perspective
    • View Full Profile
    • Timothy W Lenoir
    • Professor and primary Kimberly Jenkins Chair for New Technologies and Society
    • View Full Profile
    • Irene M Silverblatt
    • Professor of Cultural Anthropology, History and Women's Studies, Director of Undergraduate Studies and Associate Professor of Cultural Anthropology
    • Irene Silverblatt, Ph.D. University of Michigan, 1981, researches the cultural dimensions of state- building and colonization in Latin America. She is particularly interested in the relation of gender, racial discourses, and historical memory to the construction and experience of power. As a Rockefeller and Guggenheim Foundation Fellow, she will be ...
    • View Full Profile

Visiting Faculty

    •  
    • Andrew Byers
    • Visiting Assistant Professor
    • Andrew Byers' research interests include studies of gender, sexuality, race, class, medical discourse, and the military. He is currently examining the early twentieth-century U.S. Army within the context of Progressive Era social and moral reform debates. His dissertation, entitled “The Sexual Economy of War: Regulation of Sexuality and the U.S. Army, 1898-1940,” explores how the U.S. Army of the early twentieth century sought to regulate and shape the sexual ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Katharine B. Dubois
    • Visiting Assistant Professor
    • My research interests include religious belief and practice in late-medieval Latin Christendom, especially penance, pilgrimage, penitential devotion, saints' cults, and relics. My book, Pilgrimage and Pilgrims in Late-Medieval Rome (Ashgate Press, forthcoming), traces the early history of the Roman Jubilee, a year-long celebration of penitential pilgrimage to the city's most ...
    • View Full Profile
    • John R Freeman
    • Visiting Assistant Professor
    • My interdisciplinary training both as a field anthropologist and scholar of the vernacular and classical languages and literatures of India is reflected in my writings and research projects as a historical anthropologist of South Asian religions. In my principal ethnographic research, I have worked for many years on the lower-caste, spirit-possession cult of Teyyam in the state of Kerala. As a complement to this, and drawing more centrally on my textual training, ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Stephen Milder
    • Visiting Assistant Professor
    • My research focuses on democracy and environmentalism in postwar Europe. I study the way that citizens become engaged in public affairs and how people perceive of the political in the post-industrial era. My current book project traces the emergence of the environmental movement in western Europe from the grassroots up. I look at how people of many different backgrounds became involved in ...
    • View Full Profile
    •  
    • Ylana N Miller
    • Visiting Scholar
    • Memory and History: The Eichmann, Trial, Hannah Arendt, and the Construction of Jewish Community
    • View Full Profile
    • Bryan Pitts
    • Visiting Assistant Professor
    • I specialize in modern Latin America, with an emphasis on 20th century Brazilian politics. My book project investigates the understudied role of civilian political elites in the demise of Brazil's 1964-85 military dictatorship. While most studies of Brazil's democratization privilege the actions of civil society or the military itself in ending the ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Karin A. Shapiro
    • Associate Professor of the Practice
    • I study American social and southern history, as well as South African history. My interest in the political economy of race and coerced labor in both societies led to me to examine a dramatic Gilded Age labor rebellion in the Tennessee coalfields against the use of convict workers, the subject of my first book, A New South Rebellion. I am now engaged in three distinct projects. The first investigates post World-War II South African emigration to North America as ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Orion A Teal
    • Visiting Assistant Professor
    • My Dissertation explores how the generation of radicals who came of age between the Old and New Lefts navigated political dissent in New York City at the height of the Cold War.
    • View Full Profile

Adjunct Faculty

    •  
    • Deborah L Jakubs
    • Adjunct Associate Professor and Rita DiGiallonardo Holloway University Librarian and Vice Provost for Library Affairs
    • The social history of modern Latin America/Immigration/Social history of tango
    • View Full Profile
    •  
    • Mary J. Morrow
    • Special Assistant to the Senior Vice President, Alumni Affairs and Development
    • View Full Profile
    •  
    • James S Roberts
    • Adjunct Professor and Executive Vice Provost for Finance and Administration
    • View Full Profile
    •  
    • Kristina K Troost
    • Adjunct Assistant Professor of History and Head, International and Area Studies and Japanese Studies Librarian
    • View Full Profile
    • Gerald L Wilson
    • Adjunct Professor and Senior Associate Dean, Administration
    • View Full Profile

Emeriti

    • William H Chafe
    • Professor Emeritus and Alice Mary Baldwin Professor
    • Much of William Chafe's professional scholarship reflects his long-term interest in issue of race and gender equality. His dissertation and first book focused on the changing social and economic roles of American women in the fifty years after the woman suffrage amendment. Subsequent books compared the patterns of race and gender discrimination ...
    • View Full Profile
    •  
    •  
    • Peter C English
    • Professor Emeritus and M.D.
    • A professor of history and pediatrics, Peter concentrates on medical history. His special area of teaching focuses on the role of epidemic diseases and public health in the history of racial groups in the Western Hemisphere. He has written on the history of pneumonia, diphtheria, rheumatic fever and his newest book, Old Paint: A Medical History of ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Cynthia B. Herrup
    • Professor Emeritus
    • I am interested in the relationship between law (particularly criminal law) and culture. In general, I try to elucidate the ways in which legal forms and social force are in constant dialogue. My particular focus is on England in the seventeenth century. My first book was a study of how communities without lawyers make legal decisions; my second a ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Claudia Koonz
    • Professor Emeritus and Peabody Family Chair
    • How does it happen that citizens who consider themselves deeply moral can believe that some of their fellow citizens embody a danger so lethal that they must be eliminated? In "The Nazi Conscience," I examined public culture during the so-called normal years of the Third Reich (1933-1939) and identified the key role of popular racial science and expert opinion in convincing mainstream Germans that Jews, homosexuals, Roma (Gypsies) were so "alien" that they scarcely ...
    • View Full Profile
    •  
    • Seymour Mauskopf
    • Professor Emeritus and Director, Focus Interdisciplinary Programs
    • My research interests in the history of science have been quite varied over the years; they include the history of chemistry and allied sciences in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries (Crystals and Compounds, 1976), the history of chemical technology, focusing on munitions and explosives and the history of parapsychology and marginal science (The ...
    • View Full Profile
    •  
    • Sydney Nathans
    • Professor Emeritus
    • Dr. Nathans concentrates on the U.S. social and political history in the 19th century. He is the author of Daniel Webster and Jacksonian Democracy, is general editor of The Way We Lived in North Carolina, a five-volume series on the social history of North Carolina from settlement to the 20th century, and is the author of a book in the series, The ...
    • View Full Profile
    •  
    • Alex Roland
    • Professor Emeritus
    • I study military history and the history of technology. My focus has ranged over all of Western experience, and I have recently converted my undergraduate course in military history to a comparative world military history course. I have written about chariots in the second millennium B.C., Greek fire in medieval Byzantium, and computers and aerospace ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Joseph Shatzmiller
    • Professor Emeritus and Smart Family Professor of Judaic Studies
    • Dr. Shatzmiller is the author of Shylock Reconsidered: Jews, Moneylending and Medieval Society and a more recent volume on Jews, Medicine, and Medieval Society, along with numerous essays on European Jewry in the Middle Ages. He has been elected a Fellow of the American Academy for Jewish Research, and he has taught Jewish history at the University of ...
    • View Full Profile
    • John H. Thompson
    • Professor Emeritus
    • I study nineteenth and twentieth-century North American History. I teach a seminar in Canadian history [HST 183S], a comparative lecture course on the North American Wests [HST 108D], and a lecture course the relationships among Canada, Mexico and the United States [HST 108F]. In Spring 2008, I'll teach a lecture course on 'Baseball in Global Perspective.' ...
    • View Full Profile
    •  
    • Ronald G. Witt
    • Professor Emeritus
    • My interest is in the discontinuities and continuities between medieval and early European thought and especially in France and Italy. My most recent book, In the Footsteps of the Ancients. The Origins of Italian Humanism 1250-1420 interprets early Italian humanism in the light of earlier Italian intellectual traditions. A second book, still in the ...
    • View Full Profile
    •  
    • Peter H. Wood
    • Professor Emeritus
    • I have always been interested in early American history and in the interactions of diverse cultures. My undergraduate honors paper at Harvard in 1964 dealt with the Puritans' relations with the Indians, and my doctoral thesis there focused on African Americans in South Carolina before 1740. Since coming to Duke in 1975, I have taught Colonial American History and Native American History, as well as a course on the History of Documentary ...
    • View Full Profile
    •  

Staff

Graduate Students

    •  
    • Tom J. Cinq-Mars
    • I am currently interested in questions of Soviet economic development in the postwar period, particularly the role and impacts of the oil industry, broadly construed.
    • View Full Profile
    • Joshua H. Clough
    • My research currently focuses on the political networks, theoretical dialogs, and cultural exchanges between radical Haitian and French artists and intellectuals in the inter-war and post-war period.
    • View Full Profile
    • Mandy L. Cooper
    • My research interests focus on the intersections of gender and emotion in the antebellum south, particularly in the context of the family.
    • View Full Profile
    •  
    • Christina C Davidson
    • My dissertation examines the establishment of U.S. Protestant religion in the Spanish Caribbean, particularly the Dominican Republic, during the twentieth century. I am especially interested in the question of “cultural imperialism.” What does this term mean as it relates to Christian missions in the Caribbean during a time when the United States ...
    • View Full Profile
    •  
    • Risha Amadea Druckman
    • As a scholar of American history my research has focused principally on intersections among the fields of environmental, labor, and business history. In the most general sense I explore how the evolution of modern capitalism has informed popular conceptions of nature, transformed landscapes, and shaped human social relations; and conversely the role that landscape and ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Ashley L Elrod
    • I am a fourth year graduate student in Duke University’s History Department and I focus on the history of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Germany. I am interested in reform efforts to discipline religion and behavior, and their impact on gender and the family in German society. My dissertation examines gender, work, and the household economy in the ...
    • View Full Profile
    •  
    • Jonathon M. Free
    • Coal mining has always been dangerous. Experts estimate that since the beginning of the twentieth century, coalmine disasters have killed more than 100,000 people in the United States—a figure that, while arresting, does not account for the untold numbers who have died from respiratory diseases, smaller-scale accidents, or other work-related causes ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Vanessa Freije
    • My dissertation examines the role that investigative journalism played in Mexico's political democratization since the 1970s.
    • View Full Profile
    • Caroline A. Garriott
    • My dissertation research centers on the importation, production, and circulation of images of saints in the largest cities of colonial South America: Lima “City of Kings” (founded 1535) and Salvador da Bahia “”City of the Holy Savior of the Bay of all Saints” (founded 1549). How might the reception, appropriation, and transformation of colonial images ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Abby Goldman
    • My research interests are in Cold War period health and immigration policy reform in the United States. My dissertation will focus on the movement for a right to healthcare in the US, and the changing politics of the American public health profession after World War II. My committee is Bill Chafe (chair), Ed Balleisen, Sherman James (Public Policy) ...
    • View Full Profile
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    • Emily H. Margolis
    • My dissertation explores how the Revolutionary-era ideology of liberalism and individualism altered notions of gender and led to violent moments in which local communities challenged women's ownership or control of property in the American South.
    • View Full Profile
    • Christina F. Mobley
    • In my dissertation project, “The Congolese Atlantic: Central Africans in the Haitian Revolution (1791-1804),” I examine how enslaved Africans drew on their experiences in Africa to resist chattel slavery in the New World during the most successful slave revolt in history, the Haitian Revolution. Building on my Master’s Thesis, I investigate the ...
    • View Full Profile
    •  
    •  
    •  
    • Anne M. Phillips
    • As a historian of the nineteenth-century Atlantic World, I am especially interested in the study of gender and sexuality, race, labor, colonial governance, and the relationship between representation and the production of knowledge. My dissertation is tentatively titled “Adulterous Wives and Murderous Husbands: Governance, Gendered Violence, and the ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Ryan M. Poe
    • Property law erects boundaries in society, and alters relationships between a wide array of individuals: employers and employees, family members, politicians and laborers, etc. When did strict property law develop and under what circumstances? How did changes in these alter social relationships? What was the response to these altered relationships?

    • View Full Profile
    • David Romine
    • My research currently focuses on Communist authors and intellectuals in exile in Eastern Europe during the early post-war period.
    • View Full Profile
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    • Georgia Welch
    • My dissertation is a history of equal employment opportunity during the construction of the Trans Alaska Pipeline in the 1970s. I examine the $8 billion project's material and symbolic significance for workers and the nation, including the possibilities and limits the pipeline created for women, minorities, and Native Americans, and how national identity was remade through representations of ...
    • View Full Profile
    •  
    • Ashley Young
    • I am interested in exploring cultural networks in America and the Atlantic World—specifically the ways in which Americans are bonded together through food. This is not easy history; it can be as unpredictable as okra gumbo and as dark and mysterious as oysters fauche. But it is a rich and rewarding history, one that taps into the heart of cultural expression ...
    • View Full Profile
    • Corinna Zeltsman
    • I study visual and print cultures in 19th century Mexico (specifically Mexico City), focusing on the specific material practices that went into their production and the people who made them. My research asks how printers’ labors, creations, and ideas--developed through mediating between elite and working worlds--shaped Mexico’s political, cultural, and intellectual development across the ...
    • View Full Profile
  • background