• Publications of Vasant Kaiwar

      • Books

          • V. Kaiwar.
          • L’Orient postcolonial. Sur la "provincialisation de l'Europe" et la théorie postcoloniale. (Paris: Éditions Syllepse, 2012)..
          • 2012.
          • The Antinomies of Modernity: Essays on Race, Orient, Nation.
          • Duke University Press,
          • 2003.
      • Edited Volumes

          • V. Kaiwar, Sucheta Mazumdar and Thierry Labica.
          • "From Orientalism to Postcolonialism: Asia-Europe and the Lineages of Difference."
          • 2009.
      • Journal Articles

          • V. Kaiwar.
          • "“What is Postcolonial Orientalism and How Does it Matter?”(This article has also been published in French and Arabic in Transeuropéennes, with a Turkish translation forthcoming)."
          • Transeuropéennes (Paris),
          • (December, 2010)
          • .
          • V. Kaiwar.
          • "Philosophy and Politics in the Hind Swaraj of Mohandas Gandhi."
          • Journal of South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies
          • (Fall, 2007)
          • :
          • 50-69.
          Publication Description

          Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (1869-1948), the Mahatma as he has come to be known to generations of people worldwide, is widely acclaimed as the apostle of non-violent resistance to injustice. More narrowly, he is known as the architect of Indian independence from British colonial rule. Both statements are true but overly simple. Gandhi’s views on violence were more nuanced—as befits someone who saw the Bhagvad Gita as a major source of inspiration. His role in the independence movement has been studied ad nauseam and is beyond question but this paper suggests that it should be seen as part of a complex of forces that ultimately brought the Raj to a closure. However, the singular focus on Gandhian non-violence—particularly in the West—has been accompanied by a curious ignorance about Gandhi’s more significant ideas about social transformation, first developed in the Hind Swaraj, composed in 1909, and developed over time—ideas based on an uncompromising critique of modernity. Gandhi was interested in Indian independence more as a necessary first step to a greater transformation of India in which the entire society would be changed from the ground up. He has been ridiculed in India (and presumably elsewhere) by those who, like Nehru and Ambedkar, believed that village India was a den of backwardness and iniquity. Gandhi experienced village India first hand, more so than most of his critics ever did, and understood the limits of the villages of his day, both socially and economically. But, he believed that the village was still the basic building block of Indian society and would remain so for the foreseeable future. Rather than endure its existence as a necessary evil to be overcome Gandhi believed that it should be transformed and linked upwards to the centres of governance and thus play a part in the overall life of the country. People who now witness the second modern tragedy of the countryside under globalisation—the first being British colonial rule—will perhaps acknowledge Gandhi’s wisdom and farsightedness. This paper suggests that Gandhi’s ideas in this regard should receive equal, if not greater, exposure as his better known ideas on non-violence.

      • Papers Published

          • V. Kaiwar.
          • "Colonialism, difference and exoticism in the formation of the postcolonial metanarrative."
          • Littératures, Histoire des Idées, Images, Sociétés du Monde Anglophone, Université de Caen.
          • .
          • Pierre Guerlain and Thierry Madjid Labica (eds.), Perspectives transatlantiques sur les empires, Colloque organisé a l’université de Paris, X, Nanterre, Publications Paris X..
          • L'université de Caen,
          • (2007)
          • .
          Publication Description

          One of the central characteristics of postcolonial theory is the contention that colonialism—defined not so much as the history of the physical occupation and rule by European states of vast regions of the world beyond Europe but more so the attempted erasure or submergence of a whole host of life-worlds and ‘unbroken traditions’ that flourished in those regions until the arrival of modern Europe—is the defining experience of humanity in our epoch. Central to this theory is contention that traditions kept alive through generations have, by now, either been reduced to ‘history’ or simply assumed submerged forms in the consciousness and ‘world’ of the subalterns. Colonialism, with pre- and post-fixes, becomes the foundation of history, the category around which a virtual rather than historical periodisation is constructed; the postcolonial in some readings is said to originate in the first act of resistance to colonialism. However, since colonialism is defined as the usurpation of others’ life-worlds, there is no intrinsic reason why European colonization or the Enlightenment should be privileged. This privileging, one might assume, is purely strategic, related to where the postcolonial theorists are from and where they find themselves.

          • "“Silences in Postcolonial Thought: The Case of Provincializing Europe,”."
          • Economic and Political Weekly
          • Vol. XL
          • .No 34
          • (August, 2005)
          • :
          • 3732-3738.
          • ""Famines of Structural Adjustment? The Political Economy of Starvation, Past and Present."."
          • Journal of Agrarian Change
          • (2005)
          • .
          • ((Forthcoming 2005/06))
          • "Reconstructing Orientalism: Postcolonial Theory and anti-Historicist Historicism (in progress)."
          • 2005.
          • ""Des Subaltern Studies comme nouvel orientalisme: une critique de Provincializing Europe de Dipesh Chakrabarty,"."
          • ContreTemps
          • 12
          • (2005)
          • :
          • 136-50.
          • "Towards Orientalism and Nativism: The Impasse of Subaltern Studies."
          • Historical Materialism.
          • 12
          • .2
          • 2004.
          • 189-248.
          • "The Aryan Model of History: The Politics of Identity in an Age of Revolutions, Colonialism and Nationalism."
          • The Antinomies of Modernity.
          • Ed. Vasant Kaiwar & Sucheta Mazumdar.
          • chapter 2,
          • Verso Press, U.K,
          • 2003.
          • "Race, Orient, Nation in the Time-Space Modernity."
          • The Antinomies of Modernity.
          • Ed. Kaiwar & Mazumdar.
          • chapter 9,
          • Verso Press, U.K,
          • 2003.
          • "The Politics of Knowledge in the Age of Neoliberal Globalization."
          • NEPANTLA: VIEWS FROM THE SOUTH.
          • Duke University Press,
          • 2002.
          • "Comments on Fascism and 'Functional Substitutes for Fascism'."
          • Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East
          • 20
          • (2002)
          • :
          • 91-104.
          • (Debate on Fascism with Achin Vanaik; double issue on Political Geographies of Fin-de-Siecle Capitalism)
          • "Improvement without Revolution: The Impasse of Colonial Agriculture Science."
          • Festschrift for Stanley Wolpert.
          • Ed. Roger Long.
          • Delhi: Orient Longman,
          • 2001.
          • "Nature, Property and Polity in Colonial Bombay."
          • Journal of Peasant Studies
          • 27
          • .2
          • (2000)
          • :
          • 1-49.
      • Book Chapters

          • V. Kaiwar.
          • "“Famines of Structural Adjustment in Colonial India"."
          • Nationalism and Imperialism in South and Southeast Asia: Essays in Honour of Damodar R. SarDesai.
          • Ed. Roger Long and Arnold Kaminsky.
          • New Delhi:
          • Manohar,
          • 2012.
          • V. Kaiwar.
          • "“Post-colonialism, Eurocentrism, and the Question of Universalism,”."
          • World Orders Revisited.
          • Ed. Ulf Engel and Matthias Middell.
          • Leipzig:
          • University of Leipzig Press,,
          • 2010.
          • 17-51.
          • V. Kaiwar and Sucheta Mazumdar.
          • "“Coordinates of Orientalism: Reflections on the Antinomy of the Universal and the Particular,”."
          • From Orientalism to Postcolonialism: Asia-Europe and the Lineages of Difference.
          • Oxford:
          • Routledge,
          • 2009.
          • 19-43.
          • V. Kaiwar.
          • "“Hybrid and Alternative Modernities: Critical Reflections on Postcolonial Studies and the Project of Provincializing Europe,”."
          • From Orientalism to Postcolonialism: Asia-Europe and the Lineages of Difference.
          • Ed. Sucheta Mazumdar, Vasant Kaiwar and Thierry Labica.
          • Oxford:
          • Routledge,
          • 2009.
          • 206-238.
  • background