This is a representative list of courses offered by the department and should not be used for schedule planning. For accurate and up-to-date course listings and information, Duke students should log into ACES.

Spring 2014

Course Title Instructor Section Time Room
HISTORY 89S
First-year Seminar (top) 1 01 WF 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Carr 241

Course Description

Topics vary each semester offered. Instructor: Staff
HISTORY 89S
First-year Seminar (top) 1 05 TuTh 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Hudson 201

Course Description

Topics vary each semester offered. Instructor: Staff
HISTORY 103
Comp Appr Global Issues 1 01 MWF 01:40 PM-02:40 PM Biddle 101

Course Description

Introduction to critical transnational studies through several disciplinary approaches. Examines capitalism and neo-liberal globalization and their relationships to culture, politics, economics, and other social forms and outcomes; considers transnationalism "from below"; addresses linear and Western-centric thinking about progress and modernity; focuses a historical lens on political discourses, institutions, and projects to understand them contextually; demonstrates how cultures and identities are dynamically constituted in interaction with historical, material, political, and situational factors; considers how different inequalities and contestations inflect most social formations. Instructor: Campoamor or Namakkal
HISTORY 107D
Intro Econ & Business Cultures 1 001 MW 03:05 PM-03:55 PM Biddle 104

Course Description

Offers students a comparative introduction to economic cultures and business practices in different historical contexts. Examines diverse concepts of ethics in business dealings, market transactions, and economic policies. By exploring differences over time and space, students will better understand what is particular to our own practices. Particularly useful for students planning to concentrate in Economic and Business Cultures as History majors. Instructor: Partner
HISTORY 107D
Intro Econ & Business Cultures 1 01D M 04:40 PM-05:30 PM Carr 114

Course Description

Offers students a comparative introduction to economic cultures and business practices in different historical contexts. Examines diverse concepts of ethics in business dealings, market transactions, and economic policies. By exploring differences over time and space, students will better understand what is particular to our own practices. Particularly useful for students planning to concentrate in Economic and Business Cultures as History majors. Instructor: Partner
HISTORY 107D
Intro Econ & Business Cultures 1 02D W 04:40 PM-05:30 PM Friedl Bdg 118

Course Description

Offers students a comparative introduction to economic cultures and business practices in different historical contexts. Examines diverse concepts of ethics in business dealings, market transactions, and economic policies. By exploring differences over time and space, students will better understand what is particular to our own practices. Particularly useful for students planning to concentrate in Economic and Business Cultures as History majors. Instructor: Partner
HISTORY 109
Intro Human Rts & Social Mvmts 1 01 TuTh 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Carr 137

Course Description

Explores the history of human rights and conceptions of human rights in different historical contexts. Considers a range of social movements, including environmental, civil rights, women's rights, and sexual liberation movements. Particularly useful for students planning to concentrate in Human Rights and Social Movements as History majors. Instructor: MacLean
HISTORY 125S
Doc Exper: A Video Appr 1 02 W 10:05 AM-12:35 PM Bridges 104

Course Description

A documentary approach to the study of local communities through video production projects assigned by the course instructor. Working closely with these groups, students explore issues or topics of concern to the community. Students complete an edited video as their final project. Not open to students who have taken this course as Film/Video/Digital 105S. Instructor: Hawkins
HISTORY 129
Intro To African Studies 1 01 TuTh 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Friedl Bdg 240

Course Description

A range of disciplinary perspectives on key topics in contemporary African Studies: nationalism and pan-Africanism, imperialism and colonialism, genocide and famine, development and democratization, art and music, age and gender. Instructor: Staff
HISTORY 130D
Amer Dreams/amer Realities 1 001 MW 11:45 AM-12:35 PM Social Sciences 136

Course Description

Examines the role of such myths as "rags to riches," "beacon to the world," "the frontier" and "foreign devil" in defining the American character and determining hopes, fears, dreams, and actions throughout American History. Attention given to the surface consistency of these myths as accepted by each immigrant group versus the shifting content of the myths as they change to reflect the hopes and values of each of these groups. Instructor: Wilson
HISTORY 130D
Amer Dreams/amer Realities 1 01D F 10:20 AM-11:10 AM Gray 228

Course Description

Examines the role of such myths as "rags to riches," "beacon to the world," "the frontier" and "foreign devil" in defining the American character and determining hopes, fears, dreams, and actions throughout American History. Attention given to the surface consistency of these myths as accepted by each immigrant group versus the shifting content of the myths as they change to reflect the hopes and values of each of these groups. Instructor: Wilson
HISTORY 130D
Amer Dreams/amer Realities 1 02D F 10:20 AM-11:10 AM Old Chem 123

Course Description

Examines the role of such myths as "rags to riches," "beacon to the world," "the frontier" and "foreign devil" in defining the American character and determining hopes, fears, dreams, and actions throughout American History. Attention given to the surface consistency of these myths as accepted by each immigrant group versus the shifting content of the myths as they change to reflect the hopes and values of each of these groups. Instructor: Wilson
HISTORY 130D
Amer Dreams/amer Realities 1 03D F 11:45 AM-12:35 PM Gray 319

Course Description

Examines the role of such myths as "rags to riches," "beacon to the world," "the frontier" and "foreign devil" in defining the American character and determining hopes, fears, dreams, and actions throughout American History. Attention given to the surface consistency of these myths as accepted by each immigrant group versus the shifting content of the myths as they change to reflect the hopes and values of each of these groups. Instructor: Wilson
HISTORY 130D
Amer Dreams/amer Realities 1 04D F 11:45 AM-12:35 PM Social Sciences 228

Course Description

Examines the role of such myths as "rags to riches," "beacon to the world," "the frontier" and "foreign devil" in defining the American character and determining hopes, fears, dreams, and actions throughout American History. Attention given to the surface consistency of these myths as accepted by each immigrant group versus the shifting content of the myths as they change to reflect the hopes and values of each of these groups. Instructor: Wilson
HISTORY 170S
Gtwy Sem:male/fem Soldiers War 1 01 TuTh 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Carr 125

Course Description

The history of women's exclusion and inclusion into armed forces in relation to popular and competing notions of citizenship, national identity, and military service in twentieth century UK, US, Russia, Germany. The female combatant as subject of public debate, private fantasy, state regulations, and military experimentation. Close examination of male and female near-trench and trench-level experiences of combat in the two World Wars. Course materials include firsthand accounts such as memoirs and autobiographical novels and sketches, political treatises, popular literary works, academic articles, excerpts from popular U.S., European, and Russian films. Instructor: Krylova
HISTORY 171S
Gtwy Sem: History Of Intimacy 1 01 M 03:05 PM-05:35 PM Carr 229

Course Description

Examines how changing definitions of friendship, family structure, childhood, romantic love, gender roles, and sexual orientation shaped identity formation, social conflict, and cultural production through time. Course materials include letters, diaries, autobiographies, novels, government documents, and films, in addition to academic articles and books. Students produce final projects based in original research and significant secondary reading. Time period and geographical focus varies with instructor. Instructor: Deutsch and Staff
HISTORY 177S
Gtwy Sem-meaning Of Freedom 1 01 MW 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Carr 106

Course Description

Focus on American conflicts over the meaning of "freedom" or "liberty." Examination of changing definitions over time, and appraisal of the role that conflicts over "freedom" play in defining American identity and politics in the present. Course readings (mostly primary sources) introduce students to central disputes over meanings of "freedom" in American history, and student papers will also investigate conflicts or ideas about liberty. Instructor: Huston
HISTORY 183S
Gtwy Sem: Civ Rghts/asian Amer 1 01 W 04:40 PM-07:10 PM Carr 136

Course Description

Study of crucial legal and political moments in the struggle for equal civil rights of minorities, beginning with the laws of Chinese Exclusion, the struggle to define who was "White," the Asian Immigration Exclusion Acts, the relationships of Asians and African Americans and the struggle for equal schooling in the American South, the Japanese Concentration camps, the Redress and Reparations Civil Rights struggle, and the involvement of Asians Americans in the African American-led Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s, including working with Martin Luther King and Malcolm X, and Asian Americans in the anti-sweatshop unionization movement. Instructor: Mazumdar
HISTORY 190S
Gtwy Seminar: Topics In Hist 1 01 WF 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Carr 242

Course Description

Introduction to historical analysis and research in a seminar setting. Students learn how to formulate research questions, evaluate existing scholarship, interpret historical evidence, craft historical argument orally and in writing. Several sections on different topics are offered each semester
HISTORY 201
Globalization And History 1 01 TuTh 03:05 PM-04:20 PM Perkins 2071

Course Description

Examination of globalization issues in a historical perspective. Reviews phenomena, institutions, e.g. empires, states, religion, corporation, and international agencies, and policies which enabled exchange of commodities, people, and cultures. Explores empirical evidence on growth and development for different world regions and historians' and social scientists' interpretations. Examines benefit of maintaining fine balance between quantitative evidence and historical analysis in assessing waning international integration of societies, markets, and cultures from first wave of European expansion to the present. Instructor: Zanalda
HISTORY 207
Humanitarianism In Africa 1 01 MW 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Crowell 107

Course Description

Focuses on the historical impact on Africa of international humanitarian movements. Includes anti-slavery movement, missionary Christianity, Congo Reform Association, environmentalism, development, disaster aid, fight against HIV/AIDS. Instructor: Hall and Ewald
HISTORY 210
Islamic Civilization I 1 01 MW 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Perkins 2087

Course Description

First part of two-course sequence providing an extensive survey of Muslim peoples and institutions. The Middle Eastern origins and cultural attainments of medieval Islam. Instructor: Hassan, Moosa or staff
HISTORY 215S
Shamanism & Spirit Posession 1 01 WF 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Carr 106

Course Description

Anthropological, psychological, and Religious Studies approaches to cross-cultural study of spirit possession and shamanism. Examination of in-depth case-studies and comparative works, from both literate civilizations and non-literate cultures. Engage with contemporary concerns with nature and boundaries of personhood and embodiment and their relation to leadership. Instructor: Freeman
HISTORY 218
Modern & Global India 1 01 WF 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Biddle 101

Course Description

Examines the historical foundations for the emergence of India as a modern and global society with a focus on the Mughal empire, British colonialism, and Indian nationalism. Uses textual and visual sources for charting how local political, social-economic and cultural factors intersect with the global movements of peoples, goods, technologies, and ideas in the creation of the modern nation-state of India. Concludes with discussion of globalization of Indian labor, food, and Bollywood. Time frame from 1500 to present. Instructor: Kaiwar or Ramaswamy
HISTORY 221
China And The U.s. 1 01 TuTh 03:05 PM-04:20 PM Trent 142

Course Description

Starting with the arrival of Europeans and Americans in China, and moving to the Opium Wars and the Unequal Treaties to WWII, and Hollywood depictions of China, the course focuses on China since 1949 and its relationship to the United States covering themes of the Cold War, Cultural Revolution, Nixon and China and the reengagement of the two countries, Tianan
HISTORY 228
Chinatowns: A Cultural History 1 01 W 03:05 PM-05:35 PM Trent 040

Course Description

Explores the intersection of space and ethnicity through the myriad ways Chinatown has circulated as memory, fantasy, narrative, myth, in the dominant cultural imagination, and how lived realities of overseas Chinese communities, Asian American history, and changing conceptions of "Chineseness" have productively engaged with real and phantom Chinatowns. Research will emphasize multi-disciplinary approaches, such as urban history, architecture, ethnography, economics; or engagement in a creative project. Instructor: Chow
HISTORY 231
Ancient Athletes 1 01 TuTh 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Social Sciences 139

Course Description

The athletic festivals of the ancient Greeks and Romans are among the most enduring legacies of the Classical world, and provide a particularly accessible introduction to the study of antiquity. Through examination of literary and historiographical sources (in translation) and of the material remains at the ancient sites, this course introduces students to the origins and development of the major athletic contests (especially the Olympic Games), the methods and practicalities of ancient training, and the changing role of athletics in ancient and modern education, religion, and politics. We end with a survey of the modern Olympic movement, from the nineteenth century to the present. Instructor: Bromberg
HISTORY 233
Roman History 1 01 WF 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Perkins 2071

Course Description

From the founding of Rome by Romulus to the founding of Constantinople by Constantine: social, cultural, and political history. Not open to students who have taken or are taking Classical Studies 182S. Instructor: Boatwright
HISTORY 239S
Turkey: Muslim And Modern 1 01 TuTh 04:40 PM-05:55 PM Languages 320

Course Description

Turkish history from the 18th century to the present. Turkey as strategic ally of the US; candidate for membership in European Union; first Muslim country to adopt democracy, secularism, and Westernization, and as political, cultural, and economic model for other Muslim countries. Focus on Turkish people's encounter with modernity as Muslims; questions about contradictions and promises of Muslim and modern experience; informed consideration of Islam's encounter with the West. No Instructor: Tuna
HISTORY 243
History Christian Church 1 01 W 04:40 PM-07:10 PM Gray 220

Course Description

Crucial events, issues, structures, and writings that have shaped the Christian community and influenced Western civilization from the time of the early church to the present. Special attention to ethical themes such as human destiny, the "good life," reform and renewal that have been permanent elements in Christian history. Instructor: Staff
HISTORY 244
Med Christianity In Film/fictn 1 01 M 06:15 PM-08:45 PM Carr 114

Course Description

Exploration of modern popular fictional representations of Christianity in the Middle Ages, including novels and films. Comparison with original medieval sources to understand relationship between present-day interpretations and actual medieval practice, and what this reveals about both cultures. Of particular concern: ethical issues concerning Christianity and violence, wealth, power and notions of democracy and modernity. Instructor: Dubois.
HISTORY 250
Green Germany 1 01 MW 04:40 PM-05:55 PM Soc/Psych 126

Course Description

Exploration of Germany's leading global role in developing and implementing "green" technologies and environmental policies. Analyzes Germany's current and past policies on energy, agriculture, and pollution control. Examines polices in context by studying German ideas about nature, history of German environmentalism, and by looking at Green Germany in European and global perspective. Discusses extent ethics can or ought to influence debates about global climate change and its ramifications. Readings include scholarly studies, exemplary policies, and groundbreaking ecological texts. Instructor: Milder
HISTORY 254
Expansion Of Medieval Europe 1 01 TuTh 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Carr 137

Course Description

Lecture course follows the transformation of medieval politics, society and culture from the First Crusade to the Reformation. The evolution of secular monarchies and the flourishing of vernacular literature and devotion. The growth of commerce and an urban middle class. New forms of feminine religiosity and fascination with Christ's humanity. Intensified alienation and persecution of marginal groups such as the Jews. Field trip to the local museum. Instructor: Malegam
HISTORY 255
German History Through Film 1 01 TuTh 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Social Sciences 119

Course Description

Interdisciplinary seminar at intersection of German Studies and History, taught by scholars from both disciplines. Explores ways in which films shape historical imaginations and are in themselves artifacts of history. Provides unique opportunity to learn about German past and present, and reflect on relationship between film and history. Instructor: Donahue, Bonker
HISTORY 260D
Magic/rel/sci Since 1400 1 01 MW 03:05 PM-03:55 PM French Sci 2237

Course Description

The history of magic and witchcraft in western culture from the Renaissance to the present, with particular attention to the relationship of supernatural beliefs to religion and science. The renewal of magic, astrology, and alchemy in the Renaissance; early modern witch beliefs and the witch hunt; national skepticism in the Enlightenment; modern marginal sciences such as parapsychology; and adaptations of magical beliefs to modern culture in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Instructor: Robisheaux
HISTORY 260D
Magic/rel/sci Since 1400 1 01D F 01:25 PM-02:15 PM Social Sciences 228

Course Description

The history of magic and witchcraft in western culture from the Renaissance to the present, with particular attention to the relationship of supernatural beliefs to religion and science. The renewal of magic, astrology, and alchemy in the Renaissance; early modern witch beliefs and the witch hunt; national skepticism in the Enlightenment; modern marginal sciences such as parapsychology; and adaptations of magical beliefs to modern culture in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Instructor: Robisheaux
HISTORY 260D
Magic/rel/sci Since 1400 1 03D Th 03:05 PM-03:55 PM Old Chem 123

Course Description

The history of magic and witchcraft in western culture from the Renaissance to the present, with particular attention to the relationship of supernatural beliefs to religion and science. The renewal of magic, astrology, and alchemy in the Renaissance; early modern witch beliefs and the witch hunt; national skepticism in the Enlightenment; modern marginal sciences such as parapsychology; and adaptations of magical beliefs to modern culture in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Instructor: Robisheaux
HISTORY 264D
History Of Emotions 1 01 MW 10:05 AM-10:55 AM Carr 240

Course Description

Codes of conduct aimed at the management, expression, and concealment of emotion over the last thousand years of European history, with a focus on the self, manners, dress, romance, and aggression; comparison of developed Western notion of emotions with configurations of emotional expression and emotional practices in selected other parts of the world: within Islam, the Hindu tradition, Japan, certain postcolonial settings. Not open to students who have taken History 154C or Cultural Anthropology 154. Instructor: Reddy
HISTORY 264D
History Of Emotions 1 01D F 10:05 AM-10:55 AM Carr 103

Course Description

Codes of conduct aimed at the management, expression, and concealment of emotion over the last thousand years of European history, with a focus on the self, manners, dress, romance, and aggression; comparison of developed Western notion of emotions with configurations of emotional expression and emotional practices in selected other parts of the world: within Islam, the Hindu tradition, Japan, certain postcolonial settings. Not open to students who have taken History 154C or Cultural Anthropology 154. Instructor: Reddy
HISTORY 264D
History Of Emotions 1 02D F 11:45 AM-12:35 PM Friedl Bdg 107

Course Description

Codes of conduct aimed at the management, expression, and concealment of emotion over the last thousand years of European history, with a focus on the self, manners, dress, romance, and aggression; comparison of developed Western notion of emotions with configurations of emotional expression and emotional practices in selected other parts of the world: within Islam, the Hindu tradition, Japan, certain postcolonial settings. Not open to students who have taken History 154C or Cultural Anthropology 154. Instructor: Reddy
HISTORY 272
History Of Human Rights 1 01 MW 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Friedl Bdg 240

Course Description

History of human rights from antiquity to present, focusing especially on nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Explores social and philosophical controversies surrounding concept of human rights. Analyzes rapid rise of human rights discourse, tracing it from its origins in early modern philosophy to current prevalence in contemporary humanitarian and military institutions. Interrogates notion of
HISTORY 273S
Spanish Civil War 1 01 MW 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Perkins 2060

Course Description

The Spanish Civil War of 1936-39 through literary and historical readings, art, music, and film. Special attention given to values held by supporters of each side, and how they put them into practice during and after the war. Consideration of international volunteers who fought in Spain for their own deeply-held values. Research paper and presentation required. Taught in Spanish. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as Spanish 138S. Instructor: Sieburth
HISTORY 278S
Nationalism And Exile 1 01 W 06:15 PM-08:45 PM Carr 229

Course Description

The dilemmas confronting Russian and European exiles in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in the context of nation-state identities. Focuses on political and literary exiles forced from their native countries. Central to the study is the role of the modern nation-state, from whose boundaries the exiles were expelled. Instructor: Miller
HISTORY 280S
Russia: Frontiers & Minorities 1 01 TuTh 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Crowell 108

Course Description

Introduces multiconfessional, multilingual, multicultural composition of Russian & Soviet empires with questions concerning minorities in an imperial context. Learn about construction, interaction, and manipulation of cultures and identities. Balance Tsarist & Soviet efforts to modernize and Russify minorities, such as Ashkenazi Jews, Poles, & Turkic Muslims, against negotiated transformation and cultural resilience of minorities. Recognizes cultural diversity in an imperial setting and provides better appreciation of Russian and Eurasian realities and other multicultural contexts such as America. No Russian required. Instructor: Tuna
HISTORY 284
Life Within Capitalism 1 01 TuTh 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Friedl Bdg 107

Course Description

Examination of how capitalism has profoundly shaped people's ethical values, with focus on United States. Investigates central developments behind history of capitalism; explores key struggles that led to formation of capitalist logic (choices, values, goals); traces impact of capitalist goals and measures on ethical values and choices; examines discussions about possible future developments within capitalism. Instructor: Philipsen
HISTORY 287D
History Of World Wars 1 001 TuTh 03:05 PM-03:55 PM East Duke 209

Course Description

An examination of the origins, course, and consequences of the world wars of twentieth century. Close attention is paid to impact of warfare on society and the ensuing moral and political controversies. Instructor: B
HISTORY 287D
History Of World Wars 1 01D W 04:40 PM-05:30 PM Carr 135

Course Description

An examination of the origins, course, and consequences of the world wars of twentieth century. Close attention is paid to impact of warfare on society and the ensuing moral and political controversies. Instructor: B
HISTORY 287D
History Of World Wars 1 02D Th 04:40 PM-05:30 PM Carr 125

Course Description

An examination of the origins, course, and consequences of the world wars of twentieth century. Close attention is paid to impact of warfare on society and the ensuing moral and political controversies. Instructor: B
HISTORY 292
Denial, Faith, Reason 1 01 W 04:40 PM-07:10 PM East Duke 204D

Course Description

Provides historical overview and working understanding of concept of sustainability. Explores how sustainability relates to most aspects of our lives. Examines core ethical concepts, developing models to get on path of sustainable living. Instructor: Philipsen
HISTORY 297
The Holocaust 1 01 TuTh 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Soc/Psych 130

Course Description

Antisemitism and the Jewish question in Central Europe, the development of Nazi policy, the Final Solution in its different sites (ghetto, labor camps, extermination camps) and institutions (SS, Judenrat), the Holocaust's legacy. Historiographical debates and documentary research. Class might take field trip to the Holocaust Museum in Washington DC. Instructor: Hacohen
HISTORY 301S
Scientists And Public Policy 1 01 Tu 01:25 PM-03:55 PM Perkins 2059

Course Description

Explores role of scientist and non-scientist policy-makers and elected officials who have substantially shaped U.S. science research and application of scientific discoveries throughout the 20th century from within and outside the federal government. Science policies examined in larger context of political, cultural, and social events. Instructor: Haga
HISTORY 305S
History Int Fin & Mon Crises 1 01 TuTh 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Perkins 2071

Course Description

Course examines monetary/financial crises plaguing world since 16th century. Analyzes origin, unfolding, and impact of crises, debates generated by them, and formulation/implementation of policy measures. Attention to international implications/connections on European/Asian money supply, banking/credit systems; reaction to South Sea Bubble and John Law Credit Systems in numerous European nations; experiments with paper money in America; rise/demise of gold standard in 19th/20th century; currency and exchange rate problems of last three decades. Case studies will be selected and assigned according to participants' interests. Instructor: Staff
HISTORY 307
History Of Economic Thought 1 01 MWF 10:20 AM-11:10 AM Social Sciences 124

Course Description

Approaches to economic problems from Aristotle to Keynes, emphasizing certain models and doctrines - their origins, relevance, and evolution. Readings from Mun, Quesnay, Adam Smith, Malthus, Ricardo, Marx, Walras, Veblen, and Keynes. Instructor: Goodwin
HISTORY 308S
Adam Smith & Natural Liberty 1 01 TuTh 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Perkins 2085

Course Description

Seminar version of Economics 312. The writings of Adam Smith, including close readings of The Wealth of Nations and The Theory of Moral Sentiments, and selections from Mandeville, Hutcheson, Hume, Quesnay, Turgot, and Bentham. Focus on eighteenth-century views on the nature of society and the origins of prosperity, the luxury debate, and links between natural philosophy (including medical thought), and moral philosophy. Economics 311 desirable prior to taking this course. Instructor: DeMarchi
HISTORY 313D
Crime And The City 1 01 MW 08:30 AM-09:20 AM Allen 326

Course Description

Compares representation of crime and the city in two key "texts": Charles Dickens's "Oliver Twist" and HBO television series, "The Wire". Juxtaposes social and political contexts to which each text refers, paying particular attention to nature and causes of criminal activity therein. Explanations emphasizing individual or personal responsibility will be contrasted to those that take structural factors into account, including urban housing, public health, child labor, public education, poverty and its relief, urban governance, as well as the criminal justice system. Instructor: Thorne
HISTORY 313D
Crime And The City 1 01D F 08:30 AM-09:20 AM Allen 318

Course Description

Compares representation of crime and the city in two key "texts": Charles Dickens's "Oliver Twist" and HBO television series, "The Wire". Juxtaposes social and political contexts to which each text refers, paying particular attention to nature and causes of criminal activity therein. Explanations emphasizing individual or personal responsibility will be contrasted to those that take structural factors into account, including urban housing, public health, child labor, public education, poverty and its relief, urban governance, as well as the criminal justice system. Instructor: Thorne
HISTORY 313D
Crime And The City 1 02D F 10:05 AM-10:55 AM Social Sciences 311

Course Description

Compares representation of crime and the city in two key "texts": Charles Dickens's "Oliver Twist" and HBO television series, "The Wire". Juxtaposes social and political contexts to which each text refers, paying particular attention to nature and causes of criminal activity therein. Explanations emphasizing individual or personal responsibility will be contrasted to those that take structural factors into account, including urban housing, public health, child labor, public education, poverty and its relief, urban governance, as well as the criminal justice system. Instructor: Thorne
HISTORY 319
Caribbean-18th Century 1 01 MWF 12:00 PM-12:50 PM Friedl Bdg 240

Course Description

The development of Caribbean society and economy in the contexts of slavery, empire, international rivalry, and democratic revolution. Instructor: Gaspar
HISTORY 328
Global Brazil 1 01 TuTh 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Crowell 108

Course Description

Analysis of Brazilian history and culture from 1500 to the present in transnational context, with an emphasis on themes like slavery and race, regional cleavages, authoritarian rule, social inequality, and innovative attempts to expand democracy. Facilitates broad-based knowledge of a country of increasing global economic and diplomatic clout. Close examination of primary sources, including texts, images, music, and film. Instructor: French
HISTORY 330
Intro Contem Latin Amer 1 01 TuTh 03:05 PM-04:20 PM Carr 241

Course Description

Interdisciplinary introduction to the peoples, cultures, and burning issues of contemporary Latin America and the Caribbean. Required course for students seeking the certificate in Latin American Studies. Instructor: French or Olcott
HISTORY 341
United States 1870 To 1913 1 01 MW 03:05 PM-04:20 PM Friedl Bdg 126

Course Description

Industrialization, immigration, westward migration, and increased United States involvement in world political and economic affairs. The resulting political upheavals and the efforts of various groups to promote, control, or alter change. Instructor: Deutsch
HISTORY 342
Origins Of Modern America 1 01 WF 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Friedl Bdg 126

Course Description

Post World War I transformations in foreign relations, technology, literature, the arts, political and economic thought and practice; the rise of a consumer society, the growth of the state, the increase in Mexican immigration, the "New Negro," and the "Modern Woman" during the "roaring twenties" and the Great Depression. Instructor: Deutsch or Lentz-Smith
HISTORY 344D
Hist Perspectives On Pub Pol 1 001 TuTh 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Sanford 225

Course Description

Explores history of domestic and foreign policy in the United States from end of World War II to present. Illuminate how past decisions have helped to shape today
HISTORY 344D
Hist Perspectives On Pub Pol 1 01D W 06:30 PM-07:20 PM Carr 114

Course Description

Explores history of domestic and foreign policy in the United States from end of World War II to present. Illuminate how past decisions have helped to shape today
HISTORY 344D
Hist Perspectives On Pub Pol 1 02D W 06:30 PM-07:20 PM Carr 240

Course Description

Explores history of domestic and foreign policy in the United States from end of World War II to present. Illuminate how past decisions have helped to shape today
HISTORY 345D
North American Environmntl Hst 1 001 MW 10:05 AM-10:55 AM Carr 103

Course Description

Historical roles of nature - as a cultural construct and a set of biological relationships - in shaping human choices in North America, from colonial times to the present. Special attention to historical origins of contemporary environmental politics, including the origins of wilderness; environmental justice movements; the changing politics of food, animal rights, and pollution; and tragedies of the commons, and the ethical challenges posed by global warming and population growth. Instructor: Peck
HISTORY 345D
North American Environmntl Hst 1 01D F 10:20 AM-11:10 AM Carr 137

Course Description

Historical roles of nature - as a cultural construct and a set of biological relationships - in shaping human choices in North America, from colonial times to the present. Special attention to historical origins of contemporary environmental politics, including the origins of wilderness; environmental justice movements; the changing politics of food, animal rights, and pollution; and tragedies of the commons, and the ethical challenges posed by global warming and population growth. Instructor: Peck
HISTORY 345D
North American Environmntl Hst 1 02D F 11:45 AM-12:35 PM Carr 137

Course Description

Historical roles of nature - as a cultural construct and a set of biological relationships - in shaping human choices in North America, from colonial times to the present. Special attention to historical origins of contemporary environmental politics, including the origins of wilderness; environmental justice movements; the changing politics of food, animal rights, and pollution; and tragedies of the commons, and the ethical challenges posed by global warming and population growth. Instructor: Peck
HISTORY 348
Civil Rights Movement 1 01 TuTh 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Allen 103

Course Description

An interdisciplinary examination of the civil rights movement from World War II through the late 1960s. Instructor: Gavins or Lentz-Smith
HISTORY 354S
Activism, Women And Danger 1 01 W 01:25 PM-03:55 PM Bridges 113

Course Description

Immersion in the dangerous and contentious history of women's activism in the American South. Explores methods for documenting and creating narratives of women's social activism using oral history, archival research methods, and cultural production. Examines historical and contemporary women's activism including: campaigns to end racial profiling and mass incarceration, preventing environmental destruction, improving public education, advocating for undocumented workers, creating safe spaces for GLBTQ youth, and championing reproductive justice. Final project (written or multimedia) consists of documentary exploration of one specific type of southern girls' or women's activism. Instructor: Hogan
HISTORY 356S
Freedom Stories 1 01 Th 03:05 PM-05:35 PM Bridges 201

Course Description

Documentary writing course focusing on race and storytelling in the South, using fiction, autobiography, and traditional history books. Producing narratives using documentary research, interviews, and personal memories. Focus on twentieth-century racial politics. Instructor: Tyson
HISTORY 358
The South In Black And White 1 01 Tu 06:15 PM-08:45 PM Bridges 007

Course Description

Focus on present-day and historical documentary traditions in American South, with an emphasis on call and response between black and white cultures. The arts and humanities as imbedded in particular histories and cultures found in the South, and as performed in music and theater; and portrayed in documentary films, civil rights photography, Southern literature, and historical and autobiographical writing. Includes historical texts, oral histories and testimonies of living persons, along with documentary films, photographs, and writings from people in Durham and elsewhere in the region. Instructor: Tyson
HISTORY 365
Inventing Sickness 1 01 WF 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Perkins 2065

Course Description

Exploration of conceptual developments that led to the emergence of medicine in ancient Greece as a science and an art and as a contentious subject of speculative discourse. We will situate these developments firmly within their corresponding cultural, intellectual, and social contexts. Concepts examined include: notions of disease; competing views of human anatomy and physiology; natural versus supernatural causation; the ethics of medical (non-)treatment and research; the rise of the doctor; dietetic, pharmacological, and surgical practices; the doctor-patient relationship. Instructor: Gonzalez
HISTORY 371
Food In Global History 1 01 TuTh 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Carr 240

Course Description

Surveys history of food in global history, beginning with paleolithic and ending with modern era. Focuses on food quality and quantity as a factor in determining health, including problems of global health disparities, food insecurity, and obesity. Topics include the impact of food exchanges across continents and cultures, discovery of vitamins and vitamin deficiencies, growth and impact of food industries, and the rise of diseases of plenty, such as type 2 diabetes. Instructory: Humphreys
HISTORY 377
Global History Of Sexuality 1 01 TuTh 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Carr 136

Course Description

Studies human sexual behavior, classification, and regulation around the world from roughly 2000 BCE to present. Investigates moral and ethical norms regarding sex and sexuality within a wide variety of cultural and historical contexts, including ancient Near East, Greek and Roman empires, Byzantine Empire, China/Japan, pre-Columbian America, early modern Europe, colonial America/Africa/India, Victorian England, and modern US, Europe, Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Emphasizes constructed nature of sexuality, diversity of sexual behaviors across time and space, and effects of colonialism and globalization on local understandings of sexuality. Instructor: Sigal
HISTORY 381S
Veterans Oral History Project 1 01 W 06:15 PM-08:45 PM Bridges 113

Course Description

Explore methods of oral history, specifically focusing on interviewing U.S. military veterans who have served during times of conflict. Weekly readings concerning ethics of oral history work and the particulars of interviewing veterans. Learn techniques for conducting successful oral history interviews and master technical skills involving recording equipment. Conduct multiple interviews with veterans throughout semester. Discuss interviews and transcriptions with classmates. Assignments include written responses and a final presentation on conducted interviews. Includes a service-learning component involving work in the community. Instructor: Lanier
HISTORY 383
Warfare In The 20th C 1 01 WF 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Carr 114

Course Description

Key conflicts of this century evaluated in terms of causes and consequences (political, social, and economic) and strategy and technology (war plans, weapons systems, and doctrine). Comparison across regions of the world while addressing moral, legal and ethical questions regarding international conflict. Instructor: B
HISTORY 387S
Francophone Literature 1 01 MW 03:05 PM-04:20 PM Languages 305

Course Description

Modern literature in French from French-speaking Africa and the French Caribbean. Topics include tradition and modernity; colonization, cultural assimilation, and the search for identity; and women in changing contexts. Instructor: Staff
HISTORY 390
Topics In History Lecture 1 07 M 03:05 PM-05:35 PM Rubenstein 151

Course Description

Individual courses in this series may be taught more than once or on a one-time basis only. Instructor: Staff
HISTORY 390S
Topics In History Seminar 1 01 Tu 01:00 PM-03:35 PM Bridges 001

Course Description

Instructor: Staff
HISTORY 390S
Topics In History Seminar 1 02 Th 01:00 PM-03:00 PM Bridges 001

Course Description

Instructor: Staff
HISTORY 390S
Topics In History Seminar 1 03 WF 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Social Sciences 105

Course Description

Instructor: Staff
HISTORY 390S
Topics In History Seminar 1 06 M 03:05 PM-05:35 PM Bridges 001

Course Description

Instructor: Staff
HISTORY 390S
Topics In History Seminar 1 07 WF 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Carr 242

Course Description

Instructor: Staff
HISTORY 456S
Cap Sem: Intercolonial Relatns 1 01 MW 03:05 PM-04:20 PM Carr 241

Course Description

Explores the development of patterns of relations among British colonies in North America and the Caribbean and how these shaped a wider interconnected but differentiated colonial world. Discussion is framed against background of the formal framework of relations between Britain and her colonies. Themes to be explored include migration, trade, travel, the slave trade, slavery, communications, war, legal borrowing, maritime environment, cultural exchange, natural disaster. Instructor: Gaspar
HISTORY 463S
Cap Sem: Medieval Communities 1 01 TuTh 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Social Sciences 109

Course Description

Explore meaning of community in medieval period by studying a variety of living groups that emerged in Europe c. 800-1400. Examine roles of work and religion in creating communities, i.e. manorial, monastic, merchant, Islamic, Jewish, urban, and university communities, using primary and secondary sources. Instructor: Morrow
HISTORY 465S
Cap Sem: Us/mex Border 18-20c 1 01 Tu 01:40 PM-03:50 PM Carr 242

Course Description

Explores the creation and perpetual remaking of the border between the U.S. and Mexico from the 1780s to the current day. Topics explored include nation formation, citizenship and migration, public policy, border incursions, and national identity. Students will examine works of history and autobiography as well as government hearings and other primary sources. Instructor: Deutsch
HISTORY 470S
Cap Sem: Leadershp In Amer Hst 1 01 TuTh 04:40 PM-05:55 PM Soc/Psych 128

Course Description

Focuses on political, social, business and artistic leaders in American history and problems that have called for leadership. Instructor consent required. Instructor: Wilson
HISTORY 475S
Cap Sem: Race In Modern Europe 1 01 Tu 10:05 AM-12:35 PM Allen 304I

Course Description

Examines the religious and racial diversity of modern Europe, focusing on 1945-present. Explores the cultural vitality of immigrant communities, alongside the systemic discrimination and violence they face at the hands of the state and from right-wing movements. Topics include French-Muslim hip hop, Italy
HISTORY 482S
Cap Sem: Post-civil Rghts Amer 1 01 Th 03:05 PM-05:30 PM Physics 047

Course Description

Central outcomes of the Civil Rights Movement, 1968 to the present; critical reading and discussion, research and writing on racial and social equality and inequality in major areas of American life, notably electoral politics; education; religion and ethics; and public culture. Instructor: Gavins
HISTORY 487S
Cap Sem: Imm. Policy History 1 01 M 04:40 PM-07:10 PM East Duke 204D

Course Description

Immigrants and immigration policy in the United States from the late nineteenth century to the present, with focus on origins of immigrant exclusion during two waves of immigration:
HISTORY 490S
Cap Sem: Special Topics 1 01 W 01:00 PM-03:35 PM Bridges 001

Course Description

Practice of historical research interpretation and writing with focus on a specific historical question. Topics are numerous and vary each semester. Most seminars are offered for one semester and carry one course credit. If students wish to enroll in only one semester of a year-long seminar, they must obtain permission from the instructor. Both history majors and nonmajors may enroll in the seminars during their junior or senior years. Students are urged to enroll in their junior year if they expect to apply for the Senior Honors Seminar (History 495S-496S) or to practice-teach in their senior year. Instructor:Staff
HISTORY 496S
Senior Thesis Seminar 1 01 W 03:05 PM-05:30 PM Carr 229

Course Description

Continuation of History 495S. Instructor: Staff
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