Topics in History Seminar-COMPARATIVE DISABILITY HISTORY

HISTORY 390S - 05

This course investigates disability in the United States through two comparative frameworks: (1) from past to present, through the study of policy, medicine, and social identity in U.S. history from the eighteenth-century to the present; and (2) through cultural comparisons between disability in the U.S., Europe, and the Global South. Students will investigate how disability intersected with other categories of identity, including gender, sexuality, race, class, and citizenship. Weekly unit topics include the history of medicine, eugenics, institutionalization, labor and social welfare policy, Deaf culture, and civil rights activism. Instructor: Elrod

The course will equip students with transferable skills for their undergraduate careers in the humanities and social sciences, including a foundation in textual analysis and hands-on research; experience communicating their findings through empirically-based arguments; and the analytical skills to study the intersections of disability, gender, sexuality, race, class, and other categories of analysis.

Crosslisting Numbers

GSF 390S; GLHLTH 390S; PUBPOL 290S;

Curriculum Codes: 

CCI, CZ, W

Theme (Concentration)

Human Rights and Social Movements, Medicine, Science and Technology, Women, Gender and Sexuality

Region

Global and Comparative, United States and Canada